AZ Sleep & Snore Center: Fixing Sleep Apnea and Snoring

Original post at http://legalbroadcastnetwork.com/the-lbn-blog/2016/9/17/az-sleep-snore-center-fixing-sleep-apnea-and-snoring

Sleep apnea is a problem for a lot of people. New treatments for sleep apnea are now available from the AZ Sleep & Snore Center in Scottsdale.

Dr. Roger Briggs, a veteran dentist with 43 years of experience, has spent much of the last ten years or so of his practice focusing on the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea. In partnership with Dr. Leonard M. Moss, a board certified sleep medicine physician, Dr. Briggs has started the AZ Sleep & Snore Center to provide a full range of sleep disorder treatment.

The Sleep & Snore Center now offers a unique procedure called NightLase® to treat sleep apnea. This new treatment involves shining a light on the back of the throat to stimulate collagen growth. This non-surgical procedure is a blessing for patients who are unable to use oral appliances or CPAP to treat sleep apnea.

The Snore & Sleep Center is also unique in that it offers patients the skilled services of both a dentist and a medical doctor who are skilled practitioners in the treatment of sleep disorders. Together, they can devise the best treatment for their patients.

Learn more at Sleep & Snore Center’s website.

Dr. Roger Briggs has been practicing dentistry at the intersection of Scottsdale Road and Shea Boulevard in North Scottsdale for 43 years. For the last 10 years he has focused his continuing education in the area of sleep disordered breathing. Dr. Leonard Moss Has Been Practicing as a board certified sleep physician for over 15 years. Dr. Moss has an extensive background in sleep related disorders including, snoring, apnea, and insomnia. The Dentist News Network is a featured network of Sequence Media Group.

Posted on September 17, 2016 .

AZ Sleep & Snore Center: Better Treatment for Sleep Disorders

Sleep apnea is a problem for a lot of people. New treatments for sleep apnea are now available from the AZ Sleep & Snore Center in Scottsdale. Dr. Roger Briggs, a veteran Scottsdale dentist, explains what the center can do for people with snoring issues.

The Sleep & Snore Center focuses on the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea, a condition where a patient’s airway collapses at night. About 50% of people who snore at night have a sleep apnea problem.

Diagnosing sleep apnea can be done in a laboratory where patients get a full night’s sleep with technicians measuring and monitoring the sleep experience. Dr. Briggs explains that, in most cases, a diagnosis can be obtained from a home sleep test using testing equipment supplied by the Sleep & Snore Center. Then, the results of the home test can be analyzed and a treatment plan can be arrived at for whatever sleep disorder a patient might have.

Patients can download a free app, SnoreLab, for smartphones, either iPhones or Android phones. The app will record someone’s snoring and display a report on the snoring. The information from the SnoreLab app can show patients why they need help from the Sleep & Snore Center.

Snoring is more than just a social problem. It can help create calcification in the carotid artery, and that can lead to strokes.

For people with sleep apnea, CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure) is the baseline treatment. In more recent years, other treatments have come along, including APAP (automatic positive airway pressure). The Sleep & Snore Center can offer a full range of treatment options. For example, Dr. Briggs, through his experience with sleep dentistry, can create oral appliances to reposition a patient’s lower jaw during sleep, thus keeping the airway open and eliminating sleep apnea.

Another treatment option the Sleep & Snore Center offers is NightLase®. This new treatment involves shining a light on the back of the throat to stimulate collagen growth. This non-surgical procedure is a blessing for patients who are unable to use oral appliances or CPAP to treat sleep apnea.

Patients often have questions about whether they have insurance for these treatments. Dr. Briggs explains that sleep apnea treatment falls under medical insurance, so dental insurance is not an issue. Staff members at the Sleep & Snore Center can help patients with insurance claims so as to maximize benefit payments.

The Snore & Sleep Center is also unique in that it offers patients the skilled services of both Dr. Roger Briggs, a dentist, and Dr. Leonard Moss, a medical doctor, who are skilled practitioners in the treatment of sleep disorders. Together, they can devise the best treatment for their patients.

Posted on September 17, 2016 .

How To Choose An Orthodontist? Dr. Matthew Freedman In Naples, Florida Explains

Many parents will face the prospect of choosing an orthodontist for their children. Getting the right dentist is especially important for a process that will go on over a period of time. In this report, Dr. Matthew Freedman, an experienced orthodontist in Naples, Florida, explains what parents should think about and look for when making the big decision.

The obvious first consideration is proximity. Parents need to think about where they live, where they work, and what their schedules are like, including their children’s school schedules. Monthly visits to the dentist will require that everything fits together.

Dr. Matthew Freedman

Dr. Matthew Freedman

Dr. Freedman suggests that parents find an orthodontist who can deal directly with their dental insurance company. “That will be an important piece of the puzzle” for families with insurance. Dr. Freedman says that his office handles the insurance for his patients, submitting the claim and dealing with insurers to get claims paid. Patients then pay only the amount not covered by insurance and are spared a lot of hassle.

Parents should try to find an office they like, one that is pleasant to visit and that makes them and their children feel good. Monthly visits to the orthodontist should be a good experience. Parents should look for a dental office they will want to come back to.

Dr. Freedman points out that there are things parents should avoid. First off, watch out for “anything that sounds out of the ordinary.” Most parents know how their children’s teeth look (and it’s easy to take a look). Parents usually have a sense of how bad their children’s teeth are and how much work might be involved. Parents should be wary of strange dental appliances or a treatment plan that doesn’t make sense. Parents need to get an idea of how much it will probably cost them before they commit to working with an orthodontist.

Another thing parents should be aware of is that some practices will have several orthodontists. It is important that a child sees the same dentist every time. Otherwise, there may be no consistent course of treatment.

Parents will want to inquire how an orthodontist deals with children, particularly as regards calming them. Dr. Freedman’s office uses an approach of telling children what the doctor will do, then showing them how it will work, then doing the treatment. Avoiding surprises will make children calmer and more confident about their treatment. Dr. Freedman also recommends using a computer simulation to show a child how the teeth will move around during treatment.

Dr. Freedman notes that orthodontic practice doesn’t involve pain and needles in the office. So a calm, confident doctor will make the children feel better. Patience is a good thing in an orthodontist.

Dr. Freedman’s key suggestion: “Follow your gut.” Parents need to be guided by their good instincts and pick a doctor and an office that make them feel comfortable. If the fee sounds wrong, you may want to look for alternatives.

Matthew Freedman, D.M.D. is an orthodontist practicing with Main Street Children's Dentistry and Orthodontics of Naples, Florida. He attended dental school at Nova Southeastern University. Dr. Freedman started practices in Naples, Bonita Springs, and Ft. Myers. Currently the dental director for the Main Street Children’s Dentistry and Orthodontics group, he still practices full time in Naples, where his son attends the Community School of Naples. Dentist News Network is a featured network of Sequence Media Group.

Posted on September 7, 2016 .

Dental X-Ray Radiation Exposure Risks

Everyone knows that exposure to radiation carries some risks, depending on how much radiation one is exposed to. But is the risk something we should worry about, particularly dental x-rays? In this report, Dr. Dale Miles explains that the risks are minimal, especially compared to other common human activities.

Dr. Dale Miles

Dr. Dale Miles

Dr. Miles has a website, Learn Digital, that provides much helpful information about dental radiation imaging. Among the information pieces provided by the website is “One in a Million.” The document lists a series of activities that carry a one in a million risk of death for someone who participates in that activity.

The list compares the risk of dying from a full mouth series of dental x-rays (20 images) with such things as smoking 1.4 cigarettes and developing lung cancer; eating 40 tablespoons of peanut butter or drinking 30 cans of diet soda and dying because of the carcinogens involved in these food items. Similar activities include driving 40 miles in a car or flying 2,500 miles in a plane and dying in an accident.

The point, says Dr. Miles, is that the risk involved in dental x-rays is so low as to be of no concern. People who are really concerned about x-ray risk should discuss the subject with their dentists.

Dr. Dale A. Miles, D.D.S., M.S., F.R., is an Oral and Maxillofacial Radiologist in Fountain Hills, Arizona and president of EasyRiter, LLC. Formerly, he was a professor of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology and Associate Dean for Clinical Affairs at the Arizona School of Dentistry & Oral Health (ASDOH). Dentist News Network is a featured network of Sequence Media Group.

Posted on July 6, 2016 .

Using Cone-Beam CT to Reduce X-Ray Radiation Exposure

Reducing children’s exposure to x-rays is a continuing concern for dentists and others. Dr. Dale Miles explains that this is not only desirable but achievable. He points out the obvious point that adults have bigger, thicker head and jaw structures than children, so less radiation is required to produce an image. Children, especially those under the age of nine, require far less exposure time than adults.

Dr. Dale Miles

Dr. Dale Miles

And solid-state receptors can lower the radiation considerably. For example, for a dentist who still uses film-based receptors, the x-ray of a child’s tooth might take an exposure time of 0.4 seconds. A solid state receptor would reduce the exposure time to 0.04 seconds, a very big difference. Dr. Miles says that the tendency to use the same setting for every patient just can’t be done. “You have to actually determine how big the subject is.” Children are smaller than adults and need less radiation.

Cone-beam computed tomography “is dentistry’s newest, fanciest and most rapidly-adopted technology.” Dr. Miles explains that cone-beam CT is somewhat like panoramic imaging but only requires one pass around a patient’s head to get the data needed to produce a 3-D image. The device produces black and white and color images. Cone-beam CT provides some imaging of the teeth that make it possible for a dentist to plan for future procedures with assurance of what a patient’s jaw and teeth look like.

Dr. Miles says that ENT doctors are finding some interesting uses for the cone-beam imaging. Cone-beam CT works very well for the study of sinus conditions and is preferred because the dosage is so much lower than other imaging methods.

Dr. Dale A. Miles, D.D.S., M.S., F.R., is an Oral and Maxillofacial Radiologist in Fountain Hills, Arizona and president of EasyRiter, LLC. Formerly, he was a professor of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology and Associate Dean for Clinical Affairs at the Arizona School of Dentistry & Oral Health (ASDOH). Dentist News Network is a featured network of Sequence Media Group.

Posted on July 5, 2016 .

How to Create a Safe Dental X-Ray Practice

The radiation involved in imaging can be hazardous to patients, especially children. Dr. Dale Miles has given the problem some thought and has written an article explaining how a dentist can create a safe, effective x-ray practice. He offers seven how-to tips in this report.

Dr. Dale Miles

Dr. Dale Miles

1.    Develop a one-page, brief, bullet-point explanation sheet. This can help explain to parents the steps the dentist takes to minimize a child’s x-ray exposure.

2.    Explain to a parent how you will examine a child to determine the need for any x-rays. Explain how frequently x-rays may be needed, depending on whether the child has dental disease that will require follow-ups.

3.    Show the thyroid collar to both parent and child. Briefly explain why it helps protect thyroid tissues.

4.    If you use or adopt a rectangular collimation product, explain how rectangular collimation limits the beam to a smaller area. Explain how the use of this device will reduce retakes.

5.    If you use phosphor plates or solid-state detectors or even the fastest F-speed film, explain how it is more sensitive and requires less exposure time. This might be part of a procedural protocol provided to patients.

6.    If you are using a contemporary X-ray machine, show the parent the child icon on the machine and explain that it automatically selects a shorter time for the child.

7.    Locate and reprint external evidence of how low dental X-ray doses really are. Dr. Miles suggests that dentists should have a handout showing external evidence of how the risks of dental x-rays compare to other things, such as eating peanut butter or drinking wine.

Dr. Dale A. Miles, D.D.S., M.S., F.R., is an Oral and Maxillofacial Radiologist in Fountain Hills, Arizona and president of EasyRiter, LLC. Formerly, he was a professor of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology and Associate Dean for Clinical Affairs at the Arizona School of Dentistry & Oral Health (ASDOH). Dentist News Network is a featured network of Sequence Media Group.

Posted on July 5, 2016 .

What Can Dental Professionals Do to Reduce X-Ray Radiation Exposure?

The Image Gently campaign of the Alliance for Radiation Safety in Pediatric Imaging is an effort to lower radiation doses in imaging of children. In this report Dr. Dale Miles explains how using the fastest image receptors possible can help dentists and hygienists to achieve that objective.

Dr. Dale Miles

Dr. Dale Miles

Dr. Miles says that American dentists have been somewhat slow to adopt solid state digital receptors in taking dental x-rays. The technology dates to the 1980s. In spite of this, only 55% of dentists have moved to the new technology. With these digital receptors, “the exposure times are so short that the actual dose to the patient is dramatically reduced.” Solid state wire detectors should be a dentist’s first choice unless the situation is such that something with a wire is inappropriate to use on a particular child.

Dr. Miles also notes that there are new devices that can help to reduce x-ray exposure for children. There are panoramic machines that allow a dentist to take extra oral bite wings. These cavity detecting images can be taken externally without any receptor in the patient’s mouth. These devices also reduce radiation exposure for children.

Dr. Miles explains that one solution for helping dentists and hygienists reduce x-ray exposure to children is the use of the Tru-Image™ device as an add-on to a dental x-ray machine. The Tru-Image package includes a rubber adapter ring to let the device attach to the x-ray machine a dentist already owns. A ring device then attaches, and that piece collimates the x-ray beam to the size of the receptor that will be in the patient’s mouth. This system produces very accurate x-rays, eliminating the need for retakes. The device also reduces the patient’s exposure to x-rays significantly.

Another measure to reduce x-ray exposure to children is the use of the thyroid collar. Dr. Miles explains that the thyroid glands in children are very sensitive to radiation. Adult thyroid tissue doesn’t have this sensitivity.

Dr. Dale A. Miles, D.D.S., M.S., F.R., is an Oral and Maxillofacial Radiologist in Fountain Hills, Arizona andpresident of EasyRiter, LLC. Formerly, he was a professor of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology and Associate Dean for Clinical Affairs at the Arizona School of Dentistry & Oral Health (ASDOH). Dentist News Network is a featured network of Sequence Media Group.

Posted on July 5, 2016 .

What Is Image Gently?

Medical imaging using radiation is an important diagnostic and treatment tool. However, the use of radiation carries some risks, and children are especially at risk. The Alliance for Radiation Safety in Pediatric Imaging has developed a campaign called Image Gently to promote safe and effective imaging of children worldwide. Dr. Dale A. Miles explains how radiation imaging can be done in a way to protect children in this report.

Dr.Dale Miles

Dr.Dale Miles

Dr. Miles explains that the objective is to reduce CT emissions to children. Dentists use a technique called cone beam computed tomography that uses a lower energy level, but it still uses radiation, and dentists need to be concerned about it.

The Image Gently campaign is directed at the public, but the objectives of the campaign have been adopted by a number of dental organizations. The campaign includes six tenets that are important in safe imaging of children and that can guide dentists and hygienists in using radiation when children are involved.

  1. Select x-rays for individual’s needs, not merely as a routine. Radiation should be used only as needed based on a child’s medical history.

  2. Use the fastest image receptor possible. Cone beam CT should be used only when necessary.

  3. Collimate the beam. Limit the beam to the area of interest.

  4. Use a thyroid shield. New guidelines coming out in 2017 will require this. The guideline will apply to almost all procedures.

  5. Child size the exposure time. The exposure time should be reset every time the beam is used so that a child is not subjected to adult level radiation.

  6. Use the cone beam CT only when necessary.

Dental schools teach "selection criteria" to help future dentists and hygienists decide when x-rays are needed. Dr. Miles explains that a patient should be examined before there is a decision to use x-rays of any kind as a diagnostic tool.

Dr. Dale A. Miles, D.D.S., M.S., F.R., is an Oral and Maxillofacial Radiologist in Fountain Hills, Arizona and  president of EasyRiter, LLC. Formerly, he was a professor of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology and Associate Dean for Clinical Affairs at the Arizona School of Dentistry & Oral Health (ASDOH). Dentist News Network is a featured network of Sequence Media Group

 

Posted on July 5, 2016 .

Oral Health Misconceptions, With Dr. Roger Briggs, Scottsdale, Arizona

A lot of experts say that your oral health is directly related to your overall health but there are some misconceptions.  For one, people often associate sugar with tooth decay, but that's not always the case, according to Dr. Roger Briggs, a dentist in Scottsdale, Arizona with Briggs Family Dentistry.  The sugar, he says, is just the fuel that feeds the germ and in turn, it produces a lot of acid.  This acid is what makes its way into the enamel.

Another misconception is that teeth whitening can damage the enamel but if done properly, no damage will occur, says Dr. Briggs.  He cautions against using home whitening kits and urges people to see a professional about teeth whitening, so you know you're using materials that will work.

A lot of people still have amalgam fillings in their mouth, which contain mercury, raising a lot of concern about the neurotoxin mercury produces.  Dr. Briggs says that the WHO, CDC and ADA have all found that amalgam is still a fine, inexpensive restoration for the tooth.  While it's a debatable issue, Dr. Briggs is happy to replace a patient's amalgam fillings with tooth-colored fillings, should they have concerns about the mercury.  The composite overlays that Dr. Briggs uses are beautiful and long-lasting, so he feels very comfortable about doing the procedure.  As there is more cost involved with tooth-colored fillings, Dr. Briggs feels that amalgam fillings should not be banned so as to not prohibit people from taking care of their teeth.

There is concern about the existence of alcohol in mouthwash, related to a link to oral cancer and Dr. Briggs doesn't believe there should be alcohol in any mouth rinse.  With so many other options available, he says it doesn't need to be there at all.

Some wonder if wisdom teeth serve a purpose and Dr. Briggs says if they're crowding the mouth or are partially covered, they can cause some life-threatening infections.  While that's an extreme example, some people want to have them removed just to have them removed.  Dr. Briggs still has his and credits them to protecting his temporomandibular joint when he bites down hard on something.  His position, along with oral surgeons, is that they don't need to be taken out "just because they're there."  If the jaw is growing properly, wisdom teeth should be maintained and kept, he says.

Dr. Roger Briggs is with Briggs Family and Cosmetic Dentistry in Scottsdale, Arizona.  Dr. Briggs is a leading dental expert with Dentist News Network, providing online, on-demand dental news video content across many dental specialties.  Dentist News Network is a featured network of Sequence Media Group.

Posted on May 12, 2016 and filed under News.

What Causes Cavities? With Dr. Roger Briggs, Scottsdale, Arizona

While many people associate sugar with cavities, it's actually a type of bacteria that causes the tooth decay.  This bacteria is called streptococcus mutans and it thrives on refined carbohydrates.  While there is a host of friendly bacteria in the mouth, when you start feeding this particular strain, it starts to produce acid and it becomes the dominant micro organism in the mouth, says Dr. Roger Briggs, a dentist in Scottsdale, Arizona with Briggs Family Dentistry.  Deep areas of decay are formed as a result of this acid attacking the teeth.  If we can keep this bacteria from becoming the dominant one in the mouth, then we wouldn't have any issues, he says.

Dr. Roger Briggs
Dr. Roger Briggs

While children are known to having more cavities than adults, Dr. Briggs says that as adults, they can develop generational rooth carries, or decay.  He says as we get older we produce less saliva and our immune system finds it harder to fight off infection.  The root surface is not protected by enamel so in that area, root decay can form, similar to the rapid decay that forms in children.

Cavities can be a communicable disease, as the bacteria can be passed around, Dr Briggs says.  Studies have shown that of children who have a high level of decay, 80% of the time, they're inoculated by that germ from the mother and 20% from the father.  It's because the mother is the one who's in more contact with their food and utensils, by touching the food with her tongue to see if it's too hot, for example.

Dr. Roger Briggs is with Briggs Family and Cosmetic Dentistry in Scottsdale, Arizona.  Dr. Briggs is a leading dental expert with Dentist News Network, providing online, on-demand dental news video content across many dental specialties.  Dentist News Network is a featured network of Sequence Media Group.

Posted on May 12, 2016 and filed under News.

How to Find a Sleep Physician to Work With

Suppose you are a dentist who has completed the sleep dentistry training to receive your Academic Certificate in Dental Sleep Medicine and you have developed a business plan for your new sleep dentistry practice. Now, in order to complete the process, you need to connect with a sleep physician. Dr. Michael Krahe, founder of the Academy of Clinical Sleep Disorders Disciplines, explains how to do it.

Making this connection may be one of the biggest hurdles you’ll have to overcome. The ACSDD has developed a solution by partnering with a prominent sleep cardiologist who will introduce you to sleep physicians in your area. The process works this way: you provide the names of some sleep physicians in your area to the ACSDD. Then, the sleep cardiologist will make phone calls to these doctors, introducing himself and explaining that he is working with the ACSDD to prepare you to work as a sleep dentist.

This process gives you an opportunity to meet with a sleep physician and begin to build the relationship you will need.

Dr. Michael Krahe is the founder and Executive Director of The Academy of Clinical Sleep Disorders Disciplines in Carefree, Arizona. He brings over 30 years of Human Resources and Strategic Planning experience to the ACSDD. As a retired Fortune 400 Executive for a large insurance carrier, his core competencies lie in creating and sustaining a customer service-based organization. Sleep Better TV is a featured network of Sequence Media Group.

Posted on February 18, 2016 .

Implementing Sleep Dentistry in Your Practice

Suppose you are a dentist who has completed the sleep dentistry training to receive your Academic Certificate in Dental Sleep Medicine. Now, how do you actually make sleep dentistry part of your practice? Dr. Michael Krahe, founder of the Academy of Clinical Sleep Disorders Disciplines, has the solution you need.

The ACSDD has a business solutions component to solve this problem. In order to help you make the leap into sleep dentistry practice, Dr. Krahe comes to your office and spends a day working with you and your staff to put together the business plan you need. The exercise involves you and your staff working as a team to determine what needs to be done to make sleep dentistry a part of your practice.

The strength of this approach is that everyone participates and is involved in the process. Everyone is involved in making the new venture succeed. This approach also lets dentists be leaders in their practices. Dr. Krahe has been doing this sort of planning for twenty-five years or more in organizations of all sizes. He has a track record of success.

Dr. Michael Krahe is the founder and Executive Director of The Academy of Clinical Sleep Disorders Disciplines in Carefree, Arizona. He brings over 30 years of Human Resources and Strategic Planning experience to the ACSDD. As a retired Fortune 400 Executive for a large insurance carrier, his core competencies lie in creating and sustaining a customer service-based organization. Sleep Better TV is a featured network of Sequence Media Group.

Posted on February 18, 2016 .

Get into Sleep Dentistry by Using an Online Credentialing Program for Dentists

If you are a dentist who has decided to make sleep dentistry part of your practice, how do you get started? Dr. Michael Krahe, founder of the Academy of Clinical Sleep Disorders Disciplines, explains that the ACSDD has put together a unique program to help you get the necessary credentials. By completing the online program, you can earn an Academic Certificate in sleep medicine.

If you undertake the learning process on your own, you’ll find that there are small courses all over the country that you can take, but there is no guidance on how to put it all together. Attending these programs takes a lot of time and money. The ACSDD has a good, common sense answer to the problem.

There are two components you must learn in order to qualify as a sleep dentist: the sleep dentistry part of it, and the medical part you’ll need to learn in order to work with a sleep physician. The ACSDD program delivers both components online and on demand. The sleep dentistry portion of the course has been developed by an expert in sleep dentistry. This information is presented in video modules. As for the medical information, the ACSDD has brought in a neurologist/Ph.D. who is a sleep physician. He teaches the medical components of the course.

The learning process usually takes three to four months of study. A student can stop, restart, and go back over the materials as needed. This permits you to learn on your own time and not neglect your practice or your family. The course includes an extensive bibliography. The bibliography contains important articles covering a number of subjects, including the efficacy of oral appliances in dealing with sleep disordered breathing.

Once you feel ready, contact the ACSDD to arrange for a test on the material. On the arranged date, the exam will be released to you, 200 multiple choice questions covering both the dental and medical aspects of sleep dentistry. The exam takes about three hours. Upon completing the exam, you press the “send” button on your computer, and the exam is returned to the ACSDD and scored automatically. A passing score is conveyed immediately. After that, the ACSDD issues you an Academic Certificate in Dental Sleep Medicine. The certificate means that you have demonstrated understanding of the knowledge you need in order to practice sleep dentistry.

Dr. Michael Krahe is the founder and Executive Director of The Academy of Clinical Sleep Disorders Disciplines in Carefree, Arizona. He brings over 30 years of Human Resources and Strategic Planning experience to the ACSDD. As a retired Fortune 400 Executive for a large insurance carrier, his core competencies lie in creating and sustaining a customer service-based organization. Sleep Better TV is a featured network of Sequence Media Group.

Posted on February 17, 2016 .

The Runway Program for Dentists

Dentists who want to get into sleep medicine will discover that there are some hurdles that have to be gotten over in order to begin treating patients with sleep disordered breathing. Dr. Michael Krahe, founder of the Academy of Clinical Sleep Disorders Disciplines, explains that the ACSDD has what he calls the “runway program” that can help a dentist get over each of these hurdles.

Dr. Michael Krahe

Dr. Michael Krahe

What Is Dental Sleep Medicine?
The first hurdle is simply understanding what is involved, both in terms of dentistry and medicine.

How do I integrate it into my practice?
The second step is figuring out how to make it a part of an existing dental practice.

How does it work in my practice?
Once you have a plan to bring it into your practice, you need to deal with a host of questions, like how to bill for it, and how much time to allocate to a patient.

How do I get patients to come in?
Once you have everything else figured out, how do people learn about your sleep dentistry presence and begin to come to see you? The simple answer is that you need a very specific marketing program. ACSDD has developed a marketing solution in concert with Sequence Media Group (SMG), located in Scottsdale, Arizona. SMG can take video content targeted to a dentist’s geographic area that will help patients who are searching on the Internet to find your practice and visit your website to make an appointment.

How do I connect with sleep physicians?
This is the last hurdle. You need to figure out a way to meet sleep physicians and build relationships with them. ACSDD also has a solution to that problem. Stay tuned!

Dr. Michael Krahe is the founder and Executive Director of The Academy of Clinical Sleep Disorders Disciplines in Carefree, Arizona. He brings over 30 years of Human Resources and Strategic Planning experience to the ACSDD. As a retired Fortune 400 Executive for a large insurance carrier, his core competencies lie in creating and sustaining a customer service-based organization. Sleep Better TV is a featured network of Sequence Media Group.

Posted on February 16, 2016 .

Good Gum Health May Lead to Good Heart Health!

DNN’s Tasia Custode discusses the connection between good dental health and good heart health in this report.

There has long been a suggestion that there is a connection between overall mouth health and the health of the heart. And there are studies showing that those who have moderate or advanced gum disease are more likely to have cardiac problems than people with healthy gums. For example, a Mayo Clinic report suggests that heart disease, clogged arteries, and stroke might be linked to the inflammation and infection that oral bacteria can cause.

A recent study from the Forsyth Institute for Clinical and Translational Research details how gum disease treatment can prevent heart disease. Researchers want to educate the public about the connection between the mouth and the heart.

A study of heart disease patients conducted in 2013 showed that treating these patients with drugs to lower cholesterol also reduced gum inflammation in these patients.

So what is the takeaway from this research? Custode suggests three things:

  • Brush and floss your teeth at least twice a day;
  • Replace your toothbrush every few months; and
  • See your dentist regularly.

Getting your teeth cleaned and checked on a regular basis—probably every six months—is just a smart way to keep your teeth and your heart healthy.

The Dentist News Network is a featured network of the Sequence Media Group.

Posted on December 1, 2015 .

Plastic Microbeads: You May Be Brushing With Them, But You Should Stop

DNN’s Tasia Custode reports that many of us are brushing our teeth with plastic microbeads. That’s probably not a great idea, and she explains why not in this report.

Plastic microbeads are small plastic beads that are commonly used in many personal care products, including toothpaste. The beads are usually made from polyethylene, a very common plastic. The most common use for polyethylene is in packaging. These tiny beads are often incorporated into face washes and body scrubs. But they are also included in some brands of toothpaste.

The problem with this plastic is that it is not biodegradable. It never disintegrates with age. Some plastics biodegrade, but polyethylene is not one of them. By using toothpastes containing plastic microbeads, we are putting these tiny, immortal plastic beads into our bodies. That may sound undesirable, but the question remains, is this a bad thing?

The bad part of the immortal plastic beads is that they can get trapped in a person’s mouth and can trap bacteria as well. Many dentists have found these bead in their patients’ mouths during routing cleaning. These dentists are urging their patients to stop using toothpastes that contain these tiny beads. If bacteria start to form on these beads, they can lead to gingivitis, and that can lead to periodontal disease. And no one wants periodontal disease.

There’s another thing to think about. When we wash away the microbeads from our teeth or our bodies, they go into the sewer and through sewer treatment processes. But since they are too small to be filtered out, they go into our nation’s waterways. That is a sobering thought. Some companies are pledging to eliminate their use of microbeads by 2017. In the meantime, we would all do well to pay attention to what we are putting on our bodies and into our mouths.

The Dentist News Network is a featured network of the Sequence Media Group.

Posted on November 16, 2015 .

Technology to Reduce Dental X-Ray Radiation

white-teeth-2

www.interactiveimagingtv.comwww.sequencemediagroup.com Dr. Dale Miles, an oral and maxillofacial radiologist in Fountain Hills, Arizona, talks with Interactive Imaging TV about the latest advances in dental technology to reduce dental x-ray radiation, to include the Tru-Align device and more recently, the Tru-Image device, which is smaller.

Posted on October 31, 2015 and filed under High-Tech.

Anti-Depressant Use Linked to Dental Implant Failure

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A team from McGill University has discovered that people who take the most common anti-depressants are twice as likely to have dental implants fail than those who are not using them.  Anti-depressants have been linked to an increased risk of bone fracture and reduced bone formation.  The negative effect of anti-depressants on dental implants was almost equal to that of smoking. Recent research shows vulnerable patients in the ICU who received enhanced oral care from a dentist were at a significantly less risk (56% less) of developing a lower respiratory tract infection during their stay at the hospital. Researchers note that enhanced dental treatment, including oral anti-sepsis routinely used in ICU's, could be more effective in reducing the oral bacteria and help prevent migration of the bacteria into the lungs.

For more on this study by McGill University, click here.  This news update was provided by the Dentist News Network, providing online dental news video content.  The Dentist News Network is a featured network of Sequence Media Group.

Posted on October 28, 2015 and filed under News.

Study Shows Low-Income Families Still With Tooth Decay Despite Affordable Care Act

While the Affordable Care Act has made dental care for families more accessible, there are still low-income families who still suffer disproportionately from tooth decay.  These increases are with children from ages 2-5 in low-income families who have early childhood carries, according to Patrice Pascual, Executive Director of the Children's Dental Health Project. In working with an MIT Professor who does Systems Dynamics Modelling, the Children's Dental Health Project looked at what the published literature said about interventions from increased tooth brushing, to community water fluoridation, to use of xylitol gum  by pregnant women, and ran them through the model to try and estimate for this low-income population in New York state.  They tried to determine what the health savings would be, such as reduced cavities, and the potential Medicaid cost savings if these interventions expanded for the Medicaid-eligible young children.  From this, projections were derived on what the savings could be.

Patrice Pascual
Patrice Pascual

Pascual thinks there's a real opportunity for treating children based on their risk.  For example, having risk-based care would help these Medicaid children, so that when you know the child is at an increased risk, they're not just seeing the dentist twice a year but getting services and treatments beyond that.  There are a number of things that can happen that are creative, Pascual says, and not especially difficult and are high impact.

Pascual believes there's still work to be done and her hope is that this research prompts conversations in how dental benefits can be fully used for these children, so they can get the care that's based on their risk.  "Children do not have to start their life with tooth decay," and if not taken care of when they're young, the implications for child development and their oral health through adulthood are all connected through early childhood, Pascual says.

The Affordable Care Act puts the dental benefit as an essential health benefit, which is a very significant marker for integrating oral health into health, Pascual explains.  She believes it's important to raise the visibility of the importance of children's oral health with the ACA, as it generally focuses on the oral health of adults.  Pascual says that there are signs that the families coming forward to look for benefits are also being identified as being eligible for Medicaid and CHIP, which she believes is a fantastic thing.

Patrice Pascual is the Executive Director of the Children's Dental Health Project.  She spoke with the Dentist News Network, providing online dental video news and is a featured network of Sequence Media Group.

Posted on October 1, 2015 and filed under News.